Saturday, October 10, 2020

Question of the Day: "Doesn’t the Town have enough affordable housing for those who need it?"

Question of the Day: 
"Doesn’t the Town have enough affordable housing for those who need it?"

Answer: Actually, no, resoundingly no. According to the Franklin Housing Authority, the waiting list for both seniors and families is extremely long… and because there is so little turnover in the apartments we do have, the list keeps getting longer. 

Currently there are 1,252 applicants on Franklin’s one bedroom senior/disabled waiting list. We turn over about 15 units per year. We have 165 one bedroom senior/disabled units. Of the 1252 applicants, 29 are Veterans (some local) and an additional 63 are local applicants.

Franklin currently has 3,842 applicants on the Housing Authority's family waiting list. That’s right, 3,842. We have 33 units in our family stock. We have about 2 vacancies per year. Approximately 140 of these applicants are local applicants. Additionally, 57 more applicants are Veterans.

Another benefit to remember is that CPA funds can be used to help maintain our town's existing units. Recently, the Housing Authority got state funding to pay the largest part of a $2.5 Million renovation project on 40 units of senior housing. The State requires a match from other sources, and CPA funds could have helped the Town leverage the larger pot of state grant money. CPA can help tackle the cost of maintaining the units we already have.

 

If you have a question about how the Community Preservation Act (CPA) works, please email CPA4Franklin@gmail.com

 

The community room at Central Park Terrace
The community room at Central Park Terrace

Metacomet Land Trust endorses the Community Preservation Act for Franklin

The Metacomet Land Trust has worked to preserve open space in Franklin since its founding in 1988. We are proud to have helped preserve places where biodiversity thrives and where trails through woods help heal souls.

We urge all voters in Franklin to support the Community Preservation Act question on the November 3rd ballot because it will greatly add to your “toolbox” so that Franklin can do even more to protect historical buildings and landscapes, offer residents more affordable housing, develop recreational opportunities/facilities for all to enjoy and to preserve open spaces for a balanced and wonderful quality of life for generations to come.

Please vote YES! on Question 3 at the bottom of your ballot and ask your friends and family to do the same!


Sincerely,

Lisa Mosczynski 
President 
 
Full text and signature included in this PDF
 
For more info about the Metacomet Land Trust visit them online https://metacometlandtrust.org/
 
 
Metacomet Land Trust endorses the Community Preservation Act for Franklin
Metacomet Land Trust endorses the Community Preservation Act for Franklin

 

Thursday, October 8, 2020

Question of the day: "How is the CPA amount calculated?"

Question of the day:

 "How is the CPA amount calculated? Will the CPA surcharge be figured as 2% of my property value under the CPA?"

Answer: No. The CPA is a surtax of 2% of your real estate tax, not 2% of your property value. Also, the first $100,000 of residential property value is exempt, meaning that if your home is worth $300,000 only the tax on $200,000 is subject to the CPA surtax. 
 
For the average residential property owner in Franklin, the CPA will cost about $105 per year. 
 
Exemptions would be available for low-income families and for moderate income seniors.
 
 

If you have a question about how the Community Preservation Act (CPA) works, please email CPA4Franklin@gmail.com

 
 
Question of the day:  "How is the CPA amount calculated?"
Question of the day:  "How is the CPA amount calculated?"


Wednesday, October 7, 2020

Question of the day: "Does adopting the CPA mean there will be an additional tax when I sell my home?"

Question of the day:
"Does adopting the CPA mean there will be an additional tax when I sell my home?"
Answer: No. That additional tax -- the Deeds Excise Tax -- already exists, and all MA property owners pay it at the Registry of Deeds. Only communities that have adopted the CPA are eligible to get back some of the proceeds from that deeds tax when the state CPA Fund is distributed every year. 
 
Currently, Franklin property owners pay that tax and receive nothing back from it. That would change after Franklin adopts the CPA. 
 
 
Do you have a question about the Community Preservation Act? Send us your questions at cpa4franklin@gmail.com.
 
"Does adopting the CPA mean there will be an additional tax when I sell my home?"
"Does adopting the CPA mean there will be an additional tax when I sell my home?"


Tuesday, October 6, 2020

Hold the date (Oct 15) for webinar on the Community Preservation Act (CPA)

 What is the Community Preservation Act (CPA) 

and How Could CPA Help Franklin?

 

CPA for Franklin, a citizens committee supporting Ballot Question 3 to adopt the Community Preservation Act, will present a live webinar about the ballot question on Thursday, October 15, at 7:00 PM. 

Stuart Saginor, Executive Director of the statewide Community Preservation Coalition, and members of the local ballot campaign group will describe how the local option would raise funds for Historic Preservation, Open Space and Recreation, and Affordable Housing. 

Time for questions will be provided. Details about the Franklin Ballot Question 3 are posted at www.cpaforfranklin.org

For more information and to connect to the online event, please email cpa4franklin@gmail.com or text (774)571-0878. 


https://www.cpaforfranklin.org/
https://www.cpaforfranklin.org/

Question of the Day: “How many communities have adopted the CPA? And have any revoked it?”

Question of the Day: 
“How many communities have adopted the CPA? And have any revoked it?”
 
To date, 177 of the 351 cities and towns in MA have adopted the CPA. NONE have ever repealed the CPA even when the state match rate was much lower than it is now. It works, so communities have decided not to throw away a good thing.
 
 
 

If you have a question about how the Community Preservation Act (CPA) works, please email CPA4Franklin@gmail.com

 

 

Monday, October 5, 2020

350 Mass Endorses CPA For Franklin

 

Members of the Franklin Node of the statewide organization 350 Mass voted to endorse The Community Preservation Act (CPA) in Franklin. 350 Mass is a movement of volunteer members who carry out both municipal-level and statewide campaigns intended to broadly and systemically confront the climate crisis, hold our politicians accountable and undermine the destructive influence of the fossil fuel industry.

Carolyn Barthel, coordinator of the Franklin Node, said that the local node encourages Franklin residents to vote yes on question 3 on the November ballot because the CPA is in alignment with our goals of resource preservation and affordable housing. With the Community Preservation Act, Franklin will have the resources to purchase land for open spaces, maintain and improve parks and recreation areas, restore historical sites, and provide more affordable housing.

Raymond Milici, Franklin resident and a member of 350 Mass, points out that several surrounding towns, including Norfolk and Wrentham, already enjoy the benefits of CPA, and Franklin should do the same. In addition to revenues raised, via a small surcharge on property taxes (details in link below) the state will also contribute funds to help support town projects covered under the Community Preservation Act. We would get a lot for a little. A win-win for Franklin. For open spaces and more, please vote yes on 3.

For more information on what CPA is and how it works go to

 

350 Mass Endorses CPA For Franklin
350 Mass Endorses CPA For Franklin

Question of the Day: "How is the allocation of local funds prioritized?"

Question of the Day:  
"How is the allocation of local funds prioritized?"
There are protections built into the CPA which prevent all of a town’s CPA fund from being used for one category.
 
Most of the CPA funds allocated each year go into an “undesignated” CPA account.  30% of the funds are budgeted to specific categories in each year’s CPA budget: 10% each to Historic Preservation, Open Space and Recreation, and Community Housing. 5% each year can be spent to administer the program. 

And... the funds designated for a particular category can never be used for a different category. That is why the law requires 10% must be dedicated to each of the 3 categories above. Funds designated for Open Space/Recreation (together count as one category according to state law) cannot be used to fund projects in other categories. The funds set aside for each use remain available for future projects in that category.

These regulations ensure that CPA funds are used as intended.
 
 

If you have a question about how the Community Preservation Act (CPA) works, please email CPA4Franklin@gmail.com

 
 
Chilson Beach at Beaver Pond
Chilson Beach at Beaver Pond

Community Center at Central Park Terrace
Community Center at Central Park Terrace


one of Franklin's strawberry patches
one of Franklin's strawberry patches

Wouldn’t it be nice if…?

Please vote for CPA, Question 3, on or before November 3rd!

Wouldn’t it be nice if…?  
-- Open Space was retained instead of developed?
-- We had more affordable housing for use by the community?
-- Our historic buildings were maintained and used by the community?
-- Recreational space was maintained and increased for everyone to use? 


If the Community Preservation Act is passed in November, the CPA could provide funds so that Franklin could work toward all these community goals.


To learn more about CPA, visit https://www.cpaforfranklin.org/

Wouldn’t it be nice if…?
Wouldn’t it be nice if…? 

 

Sunday, October 4, 2020

Would you like a "VOTE YES FOR CPA" lawn sign?

VOTE YES FOR CPA lawn signs now available! Email cpa4franklin@gmail.com to help get the word out!

 

Would you like a "VOTE YES FOR CPA" lawn sign?
Would you like a "VOTE YES FOR CPA" lawn sign?


 

 

Question of the Day: Two questions

Questions of the Day:  

1 - Who decides how Franklin’s CPA funds would be spent? 

Once CPA is approved, the town will create a Community Preservation Committee (CPC) which will include representatives from town boards and commissions including the Conservation Commission, Recreation board, Planning Board, Affordable Housing Authority, and the Historical Commission (or individuals performing like duties if they have not been established). There will be not less than 5, not more than 9 on the CPC. 

and... 

2 - How will Franklin decide which projects will be funded? 

The approval process starts with the Community Preservation Committee (CPC) which will receive applications for projects. Those applications can come from any citizen or group, or from a Town Committee. The applications are fully reviewed by the CPC before being recommended to the Town Council. 

No CPA funds can be spent unless first approved and positively recommended by the CPC. If the CPC says ‘no’, then no CPA funds can be spent on it. 

The Town Council, as Franklin’s legislative body, has the final say on what CPA funds are spent, but cannot exceed the CPC recommended amount for any project. In other words, both the CPC and Town Council have to agree to spend the money. 

 

If you have a question about how the Community Preservation Act (CPA) works, please email CPA4Franklin@gmail.com

 

The old South Meeting House
The old South Meeting House


#30benefitsofcpaforfranklin: #2

#30benefitsofcpaforfranklin: 

# 2 -- All funds raised by the local CPA surcharge STAY IN FRANKLIN and are distributed by the Town Council. Nothing leaves Franklin. Plus, the Town will get a contribution from the state to boost our Community Preservation funds. 

 

#30benefitsofcpaforfranklin:  #2
#30benefitsofcpaforfranklin:  #2

 

#30benefitsofcpaforfranklin: - #1

#30benefitsofcpaforfranklin: 

#1 - CPA can help Franklin protect our water supply, lakes, and streams. Well-head protection and water quality in lakes and ponds are frequent CPA projects in communities around the Commonwealth.

 

DelCarte open space recreation area
DelCarte open space recreation area